FAT!

I was happy when the cancer test came back negative a few days ago. I had cancer seven years ago – diagnosed on June 1 and removed on July 1. You don’t take life for granted after that. Although there are no guarantees, I expected to feel free longer than a few days. John put his hand on my back this morning, paused, and asked, “What is this?”

There was a lump on my shoulder blade. Although I couldn’t reach it, I could see it in the mirror. He went on to his doctor’s appointment in Asheville, and I walked to the stop sign. It was a sobering walk, with lots of things going through my head. It’s best to pray before panic sets in. By the time I got home, I had seen two paths ahead. It would not be my choice which to take, but I could choose to ask God to lead the way. John had suggested I call the doctor’s office, and I got an appointment for early afternoon. He was home in plenty of time to drive me. As I sat in the waiting room, a message came on the phone that a young family member has been diagnosed with a rare form of cancer. Doctors will be considering the next step. What a blow! Lots more prayer is needed.

Amid all this serious stuff, get ready for amusement. The doctor’s assistant asked many questions, typing things into a computer. After she left, Dr. Ramsey came in and glanced at the computer. She examined the lump briefly and said in a pleasant voice, “It’s fat. Nothing to be concerned about.”

My brain went into overdrive, processing an hour’s worth of material in a few seconds. Fat has been the bane of my existence all my life. How can a serious lump be FAT??? It can’t have been there long, because the dermatologist would have noticed it a few months ago. FAT??? I’ve been worried about FAT lumping around my back? How useless! That inch I lost around my waist – are you telling me it was FAT creeping up my back, unnoticed and unhated? FAT deposits, you say? No! I make a deposit at the bank, and that is good. I made a fat deposit here, and I want an immediate withdrawal.

Having good manners, I let her talk. She explained that fat accumulates under the skin and is not dangerous. If it becomes painful or bothers me, all I need to do is call her, and she’ll set up an appointment with a general surgeon. She measured it and was most reassuring. I thanked her profusely for seeing me quickly and putting my mind at ease.

I went out to the car and immediately told John the news is good. It isn’t cancer. It is FAT!! Of course, I didn’t stop there. I want a transplant! You remember years ago a doctor told me I’d lost the fat pads in my feet? Well, I want that lump on my back to be transplanted to my left foot. What good is it on my back? Let’s put it somewhere useful. FAT!! OK. Shall we go home and have lunch?

For those who pray, please thank God with me that my cancer has not returned. Also, please pray for healing for our young family member and for guidance for her doctors. I appreciate it. God bless you.

54 thoughts on “FAT!

  1. I’m greatly relieved that it isn’t anything more serious Anne even though you are a little upset at it’s placement but as it’s fat, maybe it will slide down to that foot.
    I’m sorry to hear about the young relative and hope that her doctor’s skill will be able to heal her.
    Ginormous Hugs

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  2. I’m so happy that your cancer has not returned. Whew! How lucky you are to have been cancer free for so long.
    In regards to fat pads. I remember My grandfather having one on his wrist, my mom had one on her arm for years, and I’ve had a small one on my thigh for years. They aren’t serious.
    You have much to be grateful for. ❤️

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      1. Hi Anne,
        Am thanking God along with you that the cancer has not returned and the lump is a fatty lump. I have two on either sides of my ankles- looks awful but doesn’t cause me much concern other than giving me a slight twist in my ankle once in a while when I walk, as if to remind me its there. Since I don’t wear skirts, it doesn’t matter much. I am glad both of you are doing well. They say cut down on the sugars to reduce fatty lumps, who knows ?
        Susie

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      2. I’ve had a “fatty tumor” that has been showing up on mammograms for years – perfectly benign – and we’ve finally gotten to the point where the mammography folks stop scaring me about it. LOL. Seriously, glad to hear your cancer has not returned and am sending up prayers for the young person!

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  3. I’m so happy that your cancer has not returned! That’s wonderful!
    Fat pads do happen. My grandfather had one on his wrist for years, my mom had one on her arm, and Ive had a small one on my leg for years. They aren’t dangerous.
    But how lucky that you’ve been cancer free for so long. You are indeed blessed! ❤️

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      1. Yes, especially when one of those things is not having cancer! I hve 2 friends who are recovering from cancer surgeries, tryin to pray for them often. A question about your 40 years ago series, were you journaling or typing them at the time they happened? I could provide vague memories of 40 years ago (I was in the middle of my 10 years of single parenting), but not many specifics. Have a good evening, blessings, Michele

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        1. When we were not traveling, I’d sit down on Sunday evening and type two pages about the previous week. John took that letter to the office where he copied it and sent one to each of our mothers. I didn’t know he kept the originals. After he gave them to me, I typed them on a computer about 20 years ago. I thought it would be fun to publish them exactly 40 years after they were written. I’ve been late on a couple of them, but it didn’t seem to matter. This is the first time I’ve put photos with the words.

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                  1. Yes, historians and other writers like primary sources! That makes your letters extra special. Do you remember that was Christa McCauliffe’s goal, to keep a journal of her experiences, besides doing the science experiments, teacher in space thing. Her biography talked about the wealth of information from women’s diaries, pioneers on the westward trail.

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  4. Anne, bless and what a relief for you! No wonder you were so fearful after your cancer years ago. I’ve never heard of fat lump but beginning to wonder if my painful foot is the loss of fat on my foot pad, it seems to be more boney. I’m so sorry to read about your younger family member with such a dreadful diagnosis. Sending hugs and prayers. Xx

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    1. I had never heard about fat pads in feet until the podiatrist mentioned it. Years later a good friend said she had lost hers. The bone on the outer edge of my foot digs a hole in the insole of my sneakers. That may not happen with everyone. I should look it up on the internet. Thank you very much for hugs and prayers. xx

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  5. Lots of people have fat pads in various locations on the body. Forrest has one on his chest and one on his back. I had one years ago on a shoulder blade that I had removed. Removal wasn’t easy as it had attached to the bone, and the scar that remains looks worse than the fat pad ever did! I watch “Dr. Pimple Popper” on Discovery channel and I’m amazed at all of the non-threatening lumps and bumps that plague people.

    Prayer and healing being sent in the direction of you and your family. I’m reading an excellent book called, “Evolve your Brain – The Science of changing Your Mind” by Joe Dispenza, D.C. Their is a strong scientific basis in how the power of the human spirit can heal our bodies and lives. I’ve always believed that there is healing and change when numbers of folks gather together in thought and prayer.

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    1. One of our neighbors mentioned Dr. Pimple Popper at our Labor Day party. I had never heard of that show, but it sounds interesting.

      I read of a study done on people in the hospital. Some were prayed for, some not. I don’t think the patients knew. Anyway, those that were prayed for improved more than the others. I appreciate your prayers and healing thoughts.

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  6. As a cancer survivor I understand your angst. I have been lucky so far with only a mild bout of skin cancer. When I was a young adult (which seems like just yesterday!) I had a fatty tumor removed from my hip. It’s wasn’t difficult or even particularly painful. I just didn’t like having it fearing it would morph into cancer (which they told me it wouldn’t). I am glad that your diagnosis was so simple. No biopsy or other invasive test needed. A round of prayers all around.

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  7. Anne, dear me! What a relief! Maybe I skipped over the part, but I was unaware of your dance with cancer. I can only imagine what raced through your mind with the odd spot for a fat deposit. I often say it is all part of God’s plan but with a shoulder being the spot He chose for this lump of fat, well… I too felt relief for you and have automatically prayed for your young family member dealing with this uninvited guest. Odd indeed. Be well. oxox

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  8. SO happy & relieved for you!! I know how our minds can jump way ahead of us and cause us so much worry. The C word is probably our worst fear! I think the medical term for a lump of FAT is “lipoma,” which figures, right? Lipoma, lipids… Anyway, SO glad for you and your family that it’s a benign thing!!

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  9. I am so happy that your cancer hasn’t returned. Thank god. I pray to God you haven’t cancer. You your mind converted to other. No think about that. You trust to God’s.

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  10. What a day! The highs and lows and the angst in between and beyond. Good news on your own “fat spot” diagnosis and hugs and prayers for your young family member who needs prayers in their courageous battle down the road.

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  11. I’m so glad you are okay. I have a rather large lump of that stuff myself, it rests right on my tummy region. I rather like it. It gives me a place to rest my paw from time to time. Stay well!! and God bless.

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