Ambulance!

No one was taken to the hospital, although things looked serious with our little street clogged by two emergency vehicles. A sobering thought — all the adults I know in these six houses are over 60.

051618 Ambulance not needed.JPG

I was hurrying to get breakfast on the table. We were driving to Tennessee to pick up our repaired van, and grandson David was finding out that he had to work later. John had gone outside because of the emergency and came back with Logan. As I walked food to the table, Logan (7) made a squeaky sound with his sneakers, rubber soles on wood. Think basketball practice in a resonant gym. John asked if I had a granola bar for him to take to school for a snack. I did, but I didn’t want Logan to know where I hid them. I asked the boy to go all the way to David’s room and back while making that noise. That gave me time to get out the snack, and I could track him by the sound. An added bonus was rousing David to come to breakfast. I suspect Logan was tired of having to squeak, because he didn’t do it any more.

I asked if he had eaten, and he said he had. As John ate, Logan’s eyes kept going to my plate with a buttered English muffin. I asked, “Would you like that muffin? Eat that one, and I’ll make another for myself.”

Logan finished half the muffin when John was ready to go, and he took the other half in the car. As you might guess, grandmotherly types love to feed people.

We came back from Tennessee mid-afternoon. We found that our neighbor was home, still waiting for results of tests. For those of you so inclined, please pray for patience and healing. Thank you.

34 thoughts on “Ambulance!

    1. John’s and David’s plates had bacon and a microwaved egg topped with melted cheese. Logan probably would have liked that, but he didn’t have time to eat it. We should invite him over for breakfast this summer.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I hope your neighbor does well. It does get tough when everyone around you is of a certain age, however we had such a crisis one time when these emergency vehicles miraculously appeared when we couldn’t locate my grand daughter on her visit to the farm. There were so many wondrous things to see and she’d wandered off, but you know the south. Tons of trees burdened with kudzu and innumerable fauna to disappear into. Not to mention the cows in the field who might not like a 2 year old wandering into their territory. The search parties were immediate and in force. I finally went down into the middle of the cow pasture and slowly did a 360 scanning the edge of the woods when I saw this speck of blue about to disappear into them. How she had traveled so far is still a mystery, because she had to navigate through two pasture gates to get where she was. Thank goodness, the volunteers were johnny on the spot getting there.

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  2. You are astute when it comes to Logan and other things as well. It is scary when everyone in the neighborhood is over a certain age and I am over 60 … the other day a newspaper article described a guy who was pulled over and busted for drugs as “elderly” … he was 65 years old. I was mad, but I was not the only one – the story which I read on Facebook was loaded with comments about how 65 is not elderly, 85 maybe … not 65. The reporter felt the need to defend himself and said “anyone who is collecting social security or is on Medicare is considered elderly” … I disagree.

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    1. I think we do very well, considering our age. Bob can do amazing things repairing homes and cars. Jeff runs either seven or nine miles. He RUNS up the steep hill that I just pant on. John gets down on the ground to work with tracks and trains. The women are remarkable for all they do around their homes, and some still work. I don’t think we look or act elderly.

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      1. No, the key is to being on the go and keeping active and that is important they say for not having balance issues as you get older. The more active you are, you don’t have the problems with unsure footing, trip and falls where you could fall and break a hip which would set you back for months and many people do not fully recover. So the more active you are, the better.

        I keep forgetting that the sun is rising so early these days and I could be outside already – that spate of rainy weather made me lackadaisical in the morning … I am ready to head out the door … more rain for us Friday afternoon through Sunday afternoon, though parts of the day may be salvageable but I, like you, prefer the morning for walking. I don’t think I will make my goal this year … you cannot count on December and even parts of November and then there is the time change in October – less time to walk in the morning … I’ll try but am steeling myself that it may not happen. Now off to walk as soon as I change my clothes – PJs may not work well with walking shoes..

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      2. They are the old-fashioned ones and still in polar fleece PJs … went outside today and since it was cool in the house, figured it was cool outside, even though I listened to the weather forecast – came right back in and ditched my coat since there was no pole mailbox handy.

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      1. I agree with you Kate. In 1978 I graduated college with a degree in print journalism. We were given a style book to memorize – “elderly” was 80 years old or older. I am appalled when I see that 65 is considered elderly. I’ve even seen “elderly” described for people in their mid-50s. As a 62-year-old, that is shocking to me.

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      2. I read somewhere that it was used for people over 65 but even when I was young, elderly came with a level of frailness that you don’t see in a healthy 60-something. My brother is 87 and I wouldn’t call him elderly (although technically he is). He plays golf 3 times a week, is very mobile and his synapses are still snapping. Perhaps elderly is a bad word all the way around.

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      3. I agree with you – elderly is not a pleasant moniker; yes, it does denote frail and absent-minded, etc. It shouldn’t be used at all. And 87 years old today and years ago are certainly different. My boss is 71 and swims at least 1 mile every morning six days a week, sometimes 2 miles a day and rides his bike 26 miles daily. He had a bad shoulder injury (fell off his mountain bike) and was able to avoid surgery because of his strong chest/shoulder muscles … wore a sling a couple of weeks, avoided surgery which the doc said might not work and could make it worse. Yay to us and nay to young people who are quick to label others.

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  3. I hope your van is back with all the proper repairs this time and that none of the costs land on you. I don’t suppose it will be too long now before Logan is on his Summer break and is a regular visitor at meal times and to see if David is free to play with him. You’d better stock up on your muffins.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

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    1. John is going to the original dealer to see about getting reimbursed for the damages. I’m not sure when Logan will be out of school. Thanks for the muffin advice; I will follow through.

      xxx warm summer hugs xxx

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  4. Hope the neighbor is fine. Prayers and good wishes for them.
    How did John manage to get Logan with him when he returned- was he playing outside waiting for the school bus?Glad he got two breakfasts that day.
    Grandmothers do love to feed people.
    Susie

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  5. When I see or hear an ambulance I tend to send up a prayer for whoever is needing it. Prayed for your neighbor as well.
    Since my daughters have all left home I think I have become the “grandmotherly type”. They don’t mind because when the show up there is always some home cooked food offered. LOL>

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  6. You are *definitely* the ideal grandma! I only have grandcats and a granddog, and I admire your grandmotherliness – if that’s a word!
    Crossing fingers and toes for your neighbour!!

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