The Wedding is Over

The morning after the wedding, many of the guests gathered again for breakfast. After eating, everyone scattered.

We drove around Leadville for a while, waiting for time to go to church. The web site said the service was at 11. Hearing someone talking, we tiptoed in and sat in the last row. As we walked out a few minutes later with the rest of the congregation, John explained to the pastor that we were there for the 11 am service. He didn’t realize the published time was not correct. Here are photos of three houses I liked. The older homes in town were very colorful.

There was no landscaping to speak of. You can see where the house meets the dirt. I saw only one house that had a few scraggly shrubs around it.

We saw no homes with decks or huge windows in Leadville. I liked the house that had a fence made of skis. Most appropriate!

When we met strangers on the street or in the motel, everyone said hello. We concluded people from Colorado are not wavers, only speakers. In driving around, we noticed the houses away from the town center had no curbs. There were signs warning of dips in the road, and we assume that was for rain water and melting snow. Everything was on a slope, so water had to find its own way to the sea.

The scenery leaving Leadville was gorgeous. None of my photos show it well, but I’ll include one for the record.

Several times we went over a little creek getting to the wedding venue. John explained that it was the beginning of the Arkansas River. From the interstate, I took this view of it after other streams joined it. I found it hard to believe that some of that water would end up in the Gulf of Mexico. Not long after that we saw a sign that we were passing the continental divide.

There were some tight spaces between mountains, and we found they were called canyons here. In North Carolina, we’d call the same thing a gorge. The space was so tight in several places that opposing lanes of the interstate were stacked on top of each other. I tried to get a photo of that, but the only thing I have is one showing our side of the highway. The other side was under us.

There are more travel stories for that day, but we are on a tight schedule. I must have some sleep before we set out on a train adventure with our great nephew and his wife in Utah.

21 thoughts on “The Wedding is Over

  1. I’m curious as to the pronunciation of Leadville…is it leed or led ville? The stories you tell are fabulous and I love the colorful houses, but miss the landscaping. They do look bare. Stay safe and enjoy the trip!

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  2. I can hardly wait to catch up with you, Anne! Looks like you attended an event near another of my old stomping grounds. I agree it’s gorgeous there too. Last week, instead of driving, I took a train from SE WA to Chicagoland. Hope you enjoyed your trip as much as I did mine! TTYS!

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  3. Yes, homes do tend to lack landscaping. The winters are harsh and there really isn’t much rain compared to where you’re from and water, despite the amount you see is still frugally conserved. Pipes freeze, so to maintain outdoor plumbing is a challenge. It gets very cold up there. I remember when I first moved to CO, how so few neighborhoods had sidewalks and curbs. The longer we were there and as more out of staters moved in, they seemed to be creating developments with those included. But, where you were, in those mountain towns, it is still pretty “old world”. Some places though do have wooden sidewalks instead of concrete. If you’re going to Utah via hwy 70, you’ll pass my old town in Grand Junction. If you go to Moab the back road to it, I can’t remember what it’s called, but there’s an old “ghost” town at the beginning of it. I noticed that people are starting to inhabit it some. But, that back road is where a good many movies get made and it runs along the Colorado River.

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    1. Oh! We drove through Grand Junction. Maybe we spent the night there. Yes, I think that’s where the shower wouldn’t work. We saw signs for Moab, but we didn’t go. I hope to remember that’s where you came from.

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  4. I wish you traveling mercies Anne…my grandparents always prayed that over us before we left for the long ride home. Enjoy your trip. Lovely scenes.

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