Eye Injection

I thought the injection in the eye for macular degeneration was going to be routine, but it wasn’t this time. I’m surmising I didn’t do well reading the eye chart, which is the first quick test you are given. They shunted me to the person who takes a scan of the retina, often given at the end of the sixth cycle. After another wait, I had the numbing drops and an explanation that my retina showed a disturbance and I would be given a stronger dose than before. I’ll get another in eight weeks.

Those are the bare facts. Emotionally, it was unnerving. The audiologist reset my hearing aids to a higher level several weeks ago, and I think they are a bit too high. The waiting room was loud, but I didn’t lower the volume because I was afraid I wouldn’t hear my name called. By the time I left the office two hours later, my head was reeling with all that noise.

The injection seemed normal until after the eye was rinsed. I took the exit papers in my hand, stood up, and realized one eye was seeing only white, pure white. I always thought blindness was black, but mine was as white as snow. (They do say snow is blinding!) I walked hesitantly to stand in line to make the next appointment. I could see the exit door and knew John was waiting in the car just outside that door. If I could only make it out there, I could collapse in the car.

Thankfully, the sight began to return, and I could see where I was going without tripping over people. I was a rumpled heap for a while, but John was very patient with me.

It was a sad task to cancel the appointment I had with the eye doctor who was going to prescribe glasses. The only practical thing was to postpone it until the eye is more settled. I have learned one very important thing. I WANT glasses again! I’m extremely tired of groping for reading glasses whenever I want to see text messages, read a recipe card, know what we need from the grocery shelf, or decipher tiny script on the laptop. If I don’t whip those glasses off when I stand up, they can make me dizzy and run into things. My ears are worn out, and my patience has vanished. I want to see instantly 100% of the time, and glasses are the answer. It took me a while to want glasses when I was a young teen. It was quicker this time. Is that progress, do you think??

That one stressful day is over, thank heavens! I am back in the business of being me.

54 thoughts on “Eye Injection

  1. I am so sorry you have to go through this but it’s wonderful that there are treatments. I had eye correction surgery a long time ago and it was wonderful (I had terrible vision) except for close up. I hobbled along with readers for a while and then decided to get regular glasses. The upper part is almost clear except for a slight prescription for astigmatism but the lower part is a reader. They are wonderful. Get yourself some funky glasses!

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    1. I have five pairs of readers scattered about the house, always slightly out of reach. I’m learning to take a pair with me to read a menu or a bulletin. My next pair of prescription glasses will be a bit like yours.

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  2. That was one tough day. Though my own eye issues were just routine cataracts, I totally empathize with you about a delay in getting glasses. I was about nine months with all those frustrations — never dreamed how many times a day I would need to put those temporary reading specs on and off. And oh the joy when the specs go on when I get dressed, of when I get undressed. Take care.

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    1. Wow! I had no idea one would need to wait nine months to get glasses after cataract removal. My retina blew up as I was recovering from my second cataract surgery. Maybe I’m not so far out of line, after all. Thanks for writing about your experience.

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  3. Oh Anne, I am so sorry you are going through this, it is frightening and frustrating. I hope it clears up soon, and the combination of not seeing and hearing a lot of noise would be disconcerting. The thing I noticed in the picture though, was beautiful you! You have a beautiful smile and you radiate light. May God give you grace, comfort and healing. I never encourage anyone to pray for patience, so I will not burden you with that. Thank you for sharing. Blessings, Michele

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      1. Your 👁️ surgery. You have toeyesight is something most of take for granite. I hope your eyesight gest better . You wear hearing aids. Iam so sad 😢

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  4. Oh my, what an ordeal. I hope you are having a better day and you can get glasses again soon. Although, I must say you look very lovely in the picture. xo

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    1. The one bad day was over and done with. I’ve worn glasses most of my life, so it will be a relief to be able to see without fumbling. I can still enjoy waking up and being able to see across the room.

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  5. The stress meter must have been whirling like a fan in mid-summer. Unsettling to say the least! Elizabeth and I both have readers stashed all over the house. Such a bother! I suppose that is the price for living into the eighth decade!

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  6. We definitely take our vision and hearing for granted. When it’s taken away, even temporarily, it’s debilitating. So sorry you had to go through this. This just helps us appreciate what we have even more!🙏

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    1. Thanks, Marcia. John and I do our best to stay healthy, within reason. If the latest fad was drinking Zyla juice, we wouldn’t. (I made up Zyla juice.). I hope you are enjoying good health.

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  7. I’m glad you came through your doctor’s visit in one piece, but it sounds like an ordeal. As for getting your glasses again, you know I’m onboard with that. Soon, my dear, soon you’ll have them again

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  8. It is interesting that while all the comments vary, a strong thread runs through about how you look in that photo. I noticed it, too–it is like you are radiantly glowing and truly beautiful. I think we can all be impatient in these kinds of situations, and yet it still takes the same amount of time to work, no matter how we view it! Readers in every room of the house saved me for quite a while when my distance vision was just fine. Now it is a hassle because when I need to focus close up, it messes with the distance when I am done, and when I have on my regular glasses and need to focus close up, it messes with everything! Still, like you, I am grateful I am still functioning independently. May folks continue to provide the support you need without trying to tell you how to feel or what to do!

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    1. Problems with focus hit most of us when we get older. I remember the first time I played with my son’s hand-held game after he went to bed. I couldn’t put the game down for quite a while, and when I did, I couldn’t see anything across the room clearly. What a shock! I’m used to it now.

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  9. Well I can’t give this post a “like” (first time ever on your blog) as I can feel your angst of that day all these miles away. I know returning to the normalcy of glasses will make you happy again, so I hope it happens soon.

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